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The Road

The Road Inhaltsverzeichnis

Eine grausame Katastrophe überkommt die Erde und hinterlässt Trümmer, Schutt und Asche. Die wenigen Überlebenden sind sich selbst die nächsten und gehen für den eigenen Fortbestand über Leichen. Ein Vater und sein Sohn durchqueren das Land - ein. The Road ist ein US-amerikanischer Spielfilm von Regisseur John Hillcoat aus dem Jahr Der Film ist eine Adaption des Romans Die Straße von Cormac. Die Straße (englischer Originaltitel: The Road) ist ein Roman des amerikanischen Autors Cormac McCarthy aus dem Jahr , die deutschsprachige. threepencejournal.co - Kaufen Sie The Road günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer vielseitigen. The Road ein Film von John Hillcoat mit Viggo Mortensen, Kodi Smit-McPhee. Inhaltsangabe: Keiner weiß, wie die Katastrophe genau ablief, doch ihre.

The Road

threepencejournal.co - Kaufen Sie The Road günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer vielseitigen. Apokalypse in allen Kinos: Noch nie gab es so viele Endzeitfilme. Was John Hillcoats "The Road" über unsere Ängste sagt. Ein voll besetzter Theatersaal. Literaturfestival in Bremen. Quelle: poetry on the road. Bremens internationales Literaturfestival muss aufgrund der Corona-Virus.

So, McCarthy gets two stars for a passable if cliche script for a sci fi adventure movie, minus one star for unconscionable denigration of human suffering.

I couldn't say if McCarthy's other books are any good; I will probably try another, just to see if any part of his reputation is deserved, but this one certainly didn't help.

All I see is another author who got too big for his editors and, finding himself free to write whatever he wanted--only proved that he no longer has anything worth saying.

With descriptions that are merely lists Where stupid people say insipid stuff to each other. If what's always distinguished bad writing--flat characters, a narrative world that's View all comments.

Feb 19, Scott rated it it was amazing. I really feel compelled to write up a review of McCarthy's The Road as this book really worked for me for those of you who haven't read it, there are no real spoilers below, only random quotes and thematic commentary.

I read it last night in one sitting. Hours of almost nonstop reading. I found it to be an excellent book on so many levels that I am at a loss as to where to begin.

It was at once gripping, terrifying, utterly heart-wrenching, and completely beautiful. I have read most of McCarth I really feel compelled to write up a review of McCarthy's The Road as this book really worked for me for those of you who haven't read it, there are no real spoilers below, only random quotes and thematic commentary.

I have read most of McCarthy's other books and am already a big fan, but this one is different, perhaps his best in terms of lean, masterful prose, plot presentation, and flat-out brilliant storytelling.

Take this passage for example: "The blackness he woke to on those nights was sightless and impenetrable. A blackness to hurt your ears with listening.

Often he had to get up. No sound but the wind in the bare blackened trees. He rose and stood tottering in that cold autistic dark with his arms outheld for balance while the vestibular calculations in his skull cranked out their reckonings.

An old chronicle. The word choice and imagery is classic McCarthy yet is leaner and more honed, tighter and in turn more intense.

The whole book follows this pattern. No word, not a single one, is extraneous. This is perhaps my favorite single sentence in the book: "By day the banished sun circles the earth like a grieving mother with a lamp.

Clearly this book struck a chord with me due to the two protagonists and their predicament, a father and his young son struggling in a post-apocalyptic world.

To say I could identify with their interactions would be a huge understatement. McCarthy absolutely nails their dialog, making me marvel at how well he has mastered presenting on a page the way we communicate it isn't exactly how we talk, of course, it just seems that way.

Through some sort of magic, he writes dialog that comes across more realistically than actual dialog. Witchcraft for sure.

The young son was especially well done and was most certainly the most complicated character in the book. McCarthy presents him as a sort of supernatural being Christ figure?

He is effortlessly drawn down the path of the righteous throughout the book, as if he is God's right hand man.

The reward appears, at least superficially, to be key moments of luck. It almost wouldn't work from a literary standpoint if it didn't serve so well as a vehicle to reinforce the central theme of the book: the undeniable power of love over all else.

The theme of love, mostly presented through the bond of the father and son, is so well done as to evoke strong emotions, even now, as I consider how to present its keen development throughout the novel.

To be so desperate, in every way and at all times, and yet to survive and at times thrive, to persevere through terrible events of unbelievable horror think Steven King's The Stand on steroids would strike feelings of great, sad compassion in even the most tempered soul.

But it is much more than that of course. Consider this passage, a speaking passage from father to son, spoken during one of the most tense and horrifying scenes in the book: "You wanted to know what the bad guys looked like.

Now you know. It may happen again. My job is to take care of you. I was appointed to do that by God. I will kill anyone who touches you.

Do you understand? Interestingly, the father often resorts to violence in his role as a servant of love he sees it as his duty, in a religious sense, as stated in the quote.

Yet the boy never does and appears better for it, in so many ways, even in that terrible place.

He is the embodiment of pure goodness, and sets up the other, better side of love, the side that is unsullied by the world, that never resorts to baseness and violence, that finds beauty in even to most unlikely of places.

Like seeing a picture better when you hold it up to the light, the contrasts between these two sides is masterfully provided, page after page, in only the most well written and considered prose.

The often repeated promethean phrase "carrying the fire," agreed upon by the two protagonists as pretty much the whole point of their continuing, embodies this central theme.

The boy is carrying the fire for us all, and is perhaps the most important survivor in that shattered world, bearing the torch of love for humanity to share when it is again ready.

Not to belabor the point, but the way McCarthy handles this, all the way until the end, is nothing short of genius. Can you tell I liked the book yet?

I am amazed that I missed this book for so long, me being a huge McCarthy fan and placing him squarely at the top of the "big four" with DeLillo, Roth, and Pynchon.

Of course I have more to say but am beginning to risk actually have already thoroughly risked repeating myself and sounding like some deranged, McCarthy stalker-type.

Check this one out. It is superior literature. View all 38 comments. Mar 03, Jason rated it liked it. This wasn't nearly as funny as everybody says it is.

Jan 20, Evan rated it it was ok Shelves: pulitzer-prize , none-too-good , scifi-utopia-dystopia , reads , oprah , parody-review.

He palmed the spartan book with black cover and set out in the gray morning. Grayness, ashen. Ashen in face. Ashen in the sky.

He set out for the road, the book in hand. Bleakness, grayness. Nothing but gray, always. He was tired and hungry. The coughing had gotten worse.

He felt like he might die. But he couldn't die. Not yet. The boy depended on him. He walked down the road, awaiting the creaking bus.

It trundled from somewhere, through the gray fog. The ashen gray fog. He stepped aboard, He palmed the spartan book with black cover and set out in the gray morning.

He stepped aboard, spartan book in hand. No one spoke. They were all ghosts. Tired, wrinkled, rumpled, going wherever. Not knowing why.

Just going. He opened the book and read. He began to see a pattern, a monotonous pattern of hopelessness.

Chunks of gray hopelessness. Prose set in concrete, gray. Gray blocks of prose. He read. He recognized images from films long since past, and books from authors of yore.

Many science fiction writers, many movie makers. He thought he saw a flash, something familiar. Perhaps it was only one of his nagging dreams.

A dream of what once existed, but he did not know. Ellison, maybe? Was that the name? It seemed right, but his mind was unreliable. It had not been reliable in awhile.

People forget. Yes, they forget. The broken glasses. Cannibals, people in rags, charred bodies, emptiness, grayness.

His gray, dulled mind. Dusty, leathered, ashen bodies. The rain, the snow, the white, the cold, the gray.

The endless white. The endless gray. Had he not read and seen all this a thousand times before? What was he to make of this book he held, this spartan black book, this cobbling of all that had come before, all set forth again?

Was this original, he wondered? He continued to read. But he was tired, flagging. Rain, tin food, wet blankets, shivering, twigs and fire and cold.

Always cold, and gray. And walking, slowly. Always walking down the road. And hiding. Hiding and walking. And atrocities.

Road warriors, the bad guys. Did this also not seem familiar? The man wondered, but his mind, like those of most of the masses, often forgot.

He thanked an unseen God for this forgetfulness, for it made it easier for him to read, uncritically, unknowingly.

The author, McCarthy, no doubt also must have been relieved that no one cared anymore. Plagiarism belonged to the dead past.

A quaint notion of a bygone day. Not a concern, in these gray times. The times of sampling. Of plunder. My concoction is out of a tin can, he might have thought.

But he did not. Tin food, prepackaged. Cans waiting to be plucked and plundered. He opened the literary beenie weenies, and served them to the world.

And the world ate, hungrily ate. And believed, that beenie weenies, on their empty stomachs, tasted like the greatest gourmet dish they had ever tasted.

For they knew not any better. Their gray matter just did not know. And they went on down the road. To date, it is my most popular review on Goodreads, and for that I thank everyone.

It appeared on the Publisher's Weekly website in an article on best parody reviews on Goodreads. Thanks to everyone who agreed with me and to also those who disagreed and vigorously defended the book.

View all 73 comments. Aug 01, Jayson rated it really liked it Shelves: genre-post-apocalyptic , read-in , pp , author-american.

View all 45 comments. Jun 18, Maren rated it did not like it. Honestly, I think there's something wrong with me.

I just finished reading "The Road" today - it only took a couple of hours to get through, because it's not that long a book, and I think it was a good way to read it because I felt really immersed in the story, which is told like one long run-on nightmare of poetic import.

The characters don't get quotation marks when they speak, and I'm a terrible person because I didn't really like "The Road" and I'm not sure how I feel about Cormac McCarthy.

The characters don't get quotation marks when they speak, and for some reason McCarthy also does away with the apostrophes in words like "couldn't" and "shouldn't" - I'm still not really sure why that was necessary, it seemed a little unjustified.

The story is set in a post-apocalyptic world but the apocalypse itself is never really described or explained. I still don't really know why the world is the way it is as the story begins, other than that everything suddenly started burning and there are few survivors.

What survivors remain are generally split into "good guys" and "bad guys" - the good guys are just trying to get by and the bad guys usually kill and eat people and steal their things.

A man and his boy are walking south, yet we never really know why - to get to what? Even the man, whose plan this is, never explains the rationale more than once when he thinks that it will be warmer there.

We're meant to think that they're in America, I think, only there's little indicators of an American world or otherwise. At one point, near the end of the book, most of the artifacts they find are written in Spanish, which led me to think they had made it to Mexico possibly, but it still snows there, I think, which would be unusual.

In other words, there are few concrete details, and a lot of small conversations between the man and the boy - the man usually says "we have to keep going" or "we have to stay" and the boy says "i'm scared" or "don't leave me" and the man says "Don't be scared" or "Okay".

That was probably my biggest frustration with the book - the mundane repetitiveness of the dialogue. The language is definitely poetic and it's peppered with abstract observations about the world or life or death, but I wasn't very moved by them or the story.

I didn't feel like I got to know the characters any better as the story went along - they remained distant to me emotionally, endless travelers that I could empathize with as you would empathize with any soul wandering a post-apocalyptic desert but I didn't really feel close to anything that happened because the narrative's disjointed and abstract tone just pushed me away as much as it made me reflect on apocalypse.

It contains language of stunning beauty, dialogue that lacks distinction and punctuation, and dire situations but the characters are infinitely more real, more compelling and the situations far more disturbing.

What McCarthy only hints at, Saramago dares to depict throughout "Blindness". So, like I said, I'm sure I'm a terrible person and there's just something that I'm not getting, but I was really disappointed by "The Road" and generally find McCarthy and unenjoyable read.

View all 81 comments. The Road is a truly disturbing book; it is absorbing, mystifying and completely harrowing.

For whatever reason, be it nuclear war or environmental collapse, the world has gone to hell. It is a wasteland of perpetual greyness and ash.

Very little grows anymore, and th The Road is a truly disturbing book; it is absorbing, mystifying and completely harrowing.

Very little grows anymore, and the air itself is toxic. The survivors are made ill by their surroundings, physically, mentally and spiritually.

They cough and splutter, they struggle to carry on and lack the will to live. Civilisation has completely collapsed, but its remnants remain: the roads remain.

They are gone and I am left and they have taken with them the world. They communicate rarely, when they do it is bare and in seemingly inane phrases.

The exchanges had little to no point and were totally lacking in any substance, as the two central characters longed for something that seemed out of reach.

But it also articulates much about the psychological states of the man and the boy. Not to mention the sheer level of trauma and stress both characters are operating under.

Staying alive is all that matters, wasting energy on words in such a situation is fruitless where you barely have the strength to walk down the road for another day.

He spat in the road a bloody phlegm. Getting up this morning, he said. The farther and son are travelling to the beach, a distance of several hundred miles.

With them they push all their worldly possessions, and resources, in a shopping cart. But what other choice do they have?

The two cling onto something, a fire, a hope, that life can somehow get better. And then it continued to burn even after the mother has killed herself.

This, for me, captures a large part of the human psyche: an indomitable will to survive. The Road is suffocating; it is claustrophobic and it is entrapping.

What McCarthy shows us, is that no matter how shit human society may become has already become?

There is light at the end of the tunnel, so to speak. The entire novel is an allegory, one that is not revealed until the final few pages.

View all 26 comments. Apr 21, Glenn Russell rated it it was amazing. The view that there are two independent, primal forces in the universe, one good and one evil, is called dualism.

According to dualism, the good God does the best he can to promote good and combat evil but he can only do so much since evil is a powerful counterforce in its own right.

The ancient Gnostics were dualists with their scriptures emphasizing the mythic rather than the historic and positing our evil world of matter created not by an all-powerful God but by a flawed deity called the Demi The view that there are two independent, primal forces in the universe, one good and one evil, is called dualism.

The ancient Gnostics were dualists with their scriptures emphasizing the mythic rather than the historic and positing our evil world of matter created not by an all-powerful God but by a flawed deity called the Demiurge.

In contrast to the Demiurge, the good God of light resides above our earthly material universe in a pure, spiritual realm called the Pleroma.

I dont. Of course, McCarthy's worldview isn't necessarily the worldview of one of his characters, in this case Uncle Ellis, but my sense after reading No Country for Old Men McCarthy's worldview isn't that far removed from Gnostic dualism; rather, the world and society McCarthy creates is absolutely soaking in evil.

The evil is so strong in this McCarthy novel, one could say evil is the primal force of the universe.

A world where evil is the primal force is given an even more complete and deeper expression in McCarthy's post-Apocalyptic novel The Road, where a man and his son travel south to avoid the oncoming winter cold.

Why am I saying this? Let me offer a couple observations around two quotes: We read a reflection of the man when he was a boy about age thirteen prior to the apocalypse, "Standing at the edge of a winter field among rough men, watching while they opened up the rocky hillside ground with pick and mattock and brought to light a great bolus of serpents perhaps a hundred in number; the dull tubes of them beginning to move sluggishly in the cold hard light.

Like the bowels of some great beast exposed to the day. The men poured gasoline on them and burned them alive, having no remedy for evil but only for the image of it as they conceived it to be.

The burning snakes twisted horribly and some crawled burning across the floor of the grotto to illuminate its darker recesses.

As they were mute there were no screams of pain and the men watched them burn and writhe and blacken in just such silence themselves and they disbanded in silence in the winter dusk each with his own thoughts to go home to their suppers.

Perhaps, similar to these men, world leaders attempted to remedy the image of evil on a macro level. Here is a typical scene the man and boy come upon: "Beyond a crossroads in that wilderness they began to come upon the possessions of travelers abandoned in the road years ago.

Boxes and bags. Everything melted and black. Old plastic suitcases curled shapeless in the heat. Here and there the imprint of things wrested out of the tar by scavengers.

A mile on and they began to come upon the dead. Figures half mired in the blacktop, clutching themselves, mouths howling. What creates the drama in this dark, sinister, stinking world is the love the man has for the boy, his son, and the love the boy has for the man, his papa.

Also, the compassion the boy has for those they encounter on the road. All through their experience on the road, can we say the man holds a Gnostic-like dualist view?

He experiences the intensity of the world's evil to be sure. However, his belief in a Gnostic light realm is paradoxical.

Sometimes he reflects there is only this evil world of matter, harrowing and unrelenting; and yet sometimes he recognizes the boy as a messenger come from that otherworldly realm of light.

Cormac McCarthy - American novelist and independent spirit par excellence View all 61 comments. Make sure the first sentence contains a verb.

But neither the second. Nor the third. Repeat until finished. Or sooner deterred. Papa: Yes?

The Boy: What's this? Papa: It's an apostrophe. The Boy: What does it do? Papa: It takes two words and turns them into a contraction.

The Boy: Is that good? Papa: Years ago people used to think it was good. The Boy: What about now?

Papa: Not many people use them now. The Boy: Does the world already have enough contractions, Papa? Papa: I hadn't thought of it like that.

But you might be on to something. The Boy: What difference would it make if we threw away all the apostrophes? Papa: Not much. I don't think.

The Boy: I wonder if we could get rid of the apostrophe, then maybe The Boy: You could say we'll be well.

Papa: You're right. You know. But it could get confusing. If you wrote it down. Without an apostrophe.

All of us? Papa: We could. The Boy: Well, then, if we can get rid of all of the apostrophes, we will. Papa: But then there wouldn't be any contractions!

The Boy: Papa! Papa: Haha. I wish your grammar could hear you talking! No fall but preceded by a declination.

He caught it in his hand and watched it expire there like the last host of christendom. No one travelled this land. Ever's a long time.

Creedless shells of men tottering down the causeways like migrants in a feverland. The sparks rushed upward and died in the starless dark.

On this road there are no godspoke men. How does the never to be differ from what never was? The ash fell on the snow until it was all but black.

Paths of feral fire in the coagulate sands. The day providential to itself. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance of pain.

We're survivors he told her across the flame of the lamp. A black billcap with the logo of some vanished enterprise embroidered across the front of it.

In the darkness and the silence he could see bits of light that appeared random on the night grid. The sacred idiom shorn of its referents and so of its reality.

The dark serpentine of a dead vine running down it like the track of some enterprise on a graph. A single bit of sediment coiling in the jar on some slow hydraulic axis The cold relentless circling of the intestate earth.

There is no God and we are his prophets. They are watching for a thing that even death cannot undo Like the desolation of some alien sea breaking on the shores of a world unheard of.

One vast salt sepulchre. There were few nights lying in the dark when he did not envy the dead. I will not send you into the darkness alone.

The mudstained shapes of flooded cities burned to the waterline. A living man spoke these lines. Ten thousand dreams ensepulchred within their crozzled hearts.

The ponderous counterspectacle of things ceasing to be. The sweeping waste, hydroptic and coldly secular. There is no prophet in the earth's long chronicle who's not honored here today.

Alternative Dystopian Ending Haiku view spoiler [ In the silver light Of the moon above the beach, A big squid ate them. View all 43 comments.

Oct 14, Robin rated it did not like it Recommends it for: No one. Shelves: not-worth-it , bad-books. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. So I generally don't hate books - Recently when joining a face2face club they asked which book I disliked the most - and had no answer.

Well I want to thank Cormac McCarthy for giving me something to be able to put there. Having heard the buzz about this book and having seen the plethora of positive reviews, I felt compelled to write my own if only to be that voice of reason in a wilderness of pretentious insanity.

To do otherwise would mark them as uncultured and ignorant. What sets this novel apart from all others in its genre of ill-conception, is the totality of its failure.

There is nothing good that can be said of it. From the plot and characters to the writing style and even the cover design, the book is abysmally uninspired and a black hole of skill.

Much has been made of the writing quality. It is universally accepted that the first few sentences of any novel are the most crucial—the words which a writer labors over the most to get them just right.

Nights dark beyond darkness and the days more gray each one than what had gone before. Several members politely replied that the sentences were badly in need of work.

Not only were they not grammatically correct, but they were awkward, confusing, used several unnecessary words and had all the rhythm and pacing of a dog with four broken legs.

Nights dark beyond darkness, has got to rank up there with, it was a dark and stormy night. This is not at all an isolated example.

It is merely the beginning—literally. To seek out the upright. He took great marching steps into the nothingness, counting them against his return.

The author is clearly a master of communication. One might conclude McCarthy is attempting to reflect a realistic vernacular into his work, except that the conversations are so stilted and robotic, as to lack even the faintest aroma of realism.

There is no slang, no halted speech, no rambling. It is Dragnet. First dialog in the book: I ask you something?

Of course. Are we going to die? Not now. Okay what? Just okay. Go to sleep. That is because neither does McCarthy.

There are no quotes anywhere in the book, nor are there any tags designating the speaker, which manages to successfully make determining who is speaking quite a dilemma at times.

He rarely uses commas or apostrophes. Nor is he making the statement that he can write a whole book without punctuation as he does, on rare occasions, use a comma or an apostrophe, as you can see from the dialog segment I listed above, as if he is going senile and merely forgot.

If they had I am certain we would have heard about the suicide in the papers. Sadly, this is not the case.

Not that it lacks an excellent plot—it lacks a plot. Often times writers anguish over distilling the plot of a novel into a few sentences that might fit on the back of a book cover.

It is often impossible to clearly convey all that a book is in such a short span. The Road does not suffer this.

Instead I would imagine that if it were possible to put this book in a microwave and evaporate all the extraneous words all you would have left is one sentence: A boy and his father travel south in a post-apocalyptic United States, then the father dies.

I wonder if the blurb writer for the, The Road, realized he was also providing a spoiler for the novel so comprehensive, no one need read the book.

What the book lacks in plot it clearly makes up for in even less characterization. The father and the boy—that is about as much characterization as you will get.

We know the boy is afraid, because he says so approximately every four pages, always with the same robotic level of emotional intensity, backing it up with his many reasons, regrets and concerns as in the passage: I am scared.

Likewise, the father is equally a pot bubbling over with emotional angst and frustration so vividly expressed in his response: I know.

We might as well burn all our copies of Grapes of Wrath now that we have this tour de force. As amazing as it is, with only an eggshell of plot, McCarthy manages to run afoul of logic.

The boy and his father come across shelters packed with food and water, and yet the father insists they move on. Because they must keep moving so as to avoid encountering others.

Clearly staying in one place is the best plan to avoid meeting others, hermit do it all the time. Yes, other people might wander into you, but you double that equation if you too are roaming.

The only argument for pressing on with the journey is to find others. Of course, Duchamp's toilet Fountain was once voted "the most influential modern artwork of all time".

View all 95 comments. Jul 18, Lyn rated it really liked it. A good friend gave this to me to read. I told him I already had an audiobook working and he said, "you'll want to read this one".

I could barely put it down. McCarthy's prose is simple, fable like, yet also lyrical, like a minamalistic poet. The portrait he has painted is dark and foreboding, difficult and painful, yet he carries "the fire" throughout, a spark of hope and love that must be his central message to the reader.

Having read the book, not sure if I want to see the film, i A good friend gave this to me to read. Having read the book, not sure if I want to see the film, it may spoil my vision of McCarthy's art.

View all 57 comments. And, ladies and gentlemen of Goodreads, here is the crazy thing. I just gave it two stars and moved on with my life.

I have one theory though. It just feels right for some reason. Listening to the book forced me to slow down a little bit and take in the writing in a much different way.

It allowed me to really savor the book and chew on the words a little bit before swallowing them. Not this time though.

I love apocalyptic books anyway. I loved Station Eleven. The Stand is alright. I Am Legend was awesome. But, man, McCarthy comes in with The Road and you can literally feel the bleakness and the emptiness and the desperation in his writing.

You can see and smell the blackness and the ash and the cold. On to Blood Meridian!!!!! View all 32 comments. May 17, Annet rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Emily and Esther.

Shelves: wow-impressive , favorites , favorite-author , family-ties , have-to-read-again , wilderness-books-can-usa , heartbreaking , dark , coming-of-age , beautiful-poetic.

This book is shocking, loving, groundbreakingly impressive, beautifully written. I read through it without breathing, I mean I just had to know what was coming on the next page, and cried several times.

Without a doubt one of the best books, if not the best , I read, ever View all 19 comments.

One of my favourite of all time. Loved everything. View all 7 comments. Jul 10, Paquita Maria Sanchez rated it it was amazing Shelves: usa , literature.

View all 51 comments. Jun 29, Ian rated it did not like it Shelves: unfulfilled-expectations , best-sellers-that-suck , not-for-kids.

I just read some guy's review of The Road that contained the following: "In the three hours that I read this book I found myself crying, laughing, shouting, and most of the time my lip was trembling.

As soon as I finished it, I sat there feeling numb, but not in a bad way, actually sort of like I was high.

I mean, really? Your lip was trembling? And you felt high? And your lip was trembling? Pherphuxake, what do you even say to someone like that?

I have to consciously restrain myself from judging those of you who believe the book has merit.

It's as though McCarthy deliberately designed his book to be the antithesis of what I think makes for quality reading.

I make my home in the pretensions-and-self-indulgent camp. I require no punctuation to convey my meaning.

Indeed my message is too powerful to be contained by the same convention that restricts the middling novelist, too important to suffer the vandalism of punctuation.

So punctuation is not the only suck-quotient factor here. Instead, I believe The Road sucks because it sucks every possible way a book can suck.

I have an almost vehement reaction to The Road and to the rather large group of slobbering, screaming, panties-throwing admirers. In the interest of intellectual honesty, I challenged myself to figure out why this is.

Why must I look down on people who love The Road with a feeling of disgusted superiority? Critics praise The Road but glibly waive off sci-fi as a genre for people who never grew out of their childlike amusement for light sabers or their adolescent fascination with space battles.

Sci-fi is relegated to its own awards and events, left out of consideration for broader literary honors, leaving me with the impression that the literary world does not perceive sci-fi to be real, legitimate literature.

But from my point of view The Road is the adolescent work. By the standards under which I would judge a quality sci-fi novel or any quality novel , The Road is shallow and simple, along with unoriginal and obvious.

It is beyond me how The Road can be the guest of honor while much deeper books with beautiful language and original, thought-provoking ideas are not even invited to the party because they happen to be sci-fi.

They tell me The Road is rich and deep. They tell me to forget the quotation marks and the nameless characters and look at what McCarthy is trying to tell us.

The Road tells us this, and it talks about that, and speaks to this other thing. McCarthy please sign my boobs! The book was easy to read and simple to comprehend.

Everything was right there on the surface, served with a spoon, and what we were served had no flavor, no spice, no originality.

My problem is that, for something so beloved and critically acclaimed, for something written by a writer with such talent, The Road fails utterly, a shell without substance that collapses in upon itself in a heap of triteness and unoriginality.

To put it yet another way, The Road was just so goddamn boring. I want a book that makes me pay attention and use my noggin. I want to work at peeling back layers and making connections.

When I find them, I want the author's ideas and insights to be original, edifying, and thought-provoking. I want artful prose, relatable characters, realistic motivations, and poetic plot points.

And guess what, I find no shortage of books on the sci-fi shelves that meet those criteria. There are plenty of truly excellent books of contemporary literature; I have read and enjoyed several, including one or two that have touched me deeply.

Likewise there are plenty of truly excellent books on the sci-fi genre. My point is simply that, despite the dismissive attitude of many literary critics, the sci-fi shelves contain books that are as good as anything out there: books as rich and complex, as insightful and layered, as edifying and beautiful as anything in contemporary literature.

So when something like The Road is hailed as a masterpiece while some truly brilliant works of sci-fi—works that could mop the floor with The Road in every facet— are acknowledged only by a roll of the eyes Two lonely figures appear out in the sparse, dark landscape walking by in the gloom going forward to oblivion probably, never resting until they find the nebulous nirvana; which may not be.

A man and his boy both remain nameless throughout the book, hungry, tired dispirited wearing rags living if this is the proper word trying to survive a world changed forever The disaster that ended civilization is never explained some kind of plague?

Man- made or natural does it matter either way The father wants to move down the road from the excruciating cold of the snowy mountains urging his son unceasingly to reach the sea on what was California but not anymore.

Former cities never given their former names rivers likewise what's the point, the dead places will never arise again.

Meeting the few people trying to exist but trusting no one the strangers steal everything, and leave nothing behind but mayhem, the only importance is to keep on breathing The father loves the son yet he doesn't believe in the goodness of beings unlike the boy who sees the sufferings and wants to help the unfortunate.

Still the dad knows the consequences himself of chance encounters some people are of dubious nature. They destroy without feeling slaughter or be slaughtered their belief and get out of the way the unlucky.

No birds in the sky, fish in the sea or animals roaming the terrain an eerie ambiance which brings depression to all as the desolation prevails.

The rains come down soaking the two as they push their shopping cart with little inside mud hinders, water temporary stops the hopeless journey, illness causes much misery lying on the freezing wet ground, entering homes which have seen better times grabbing the essentials however unappetizing it looks.

Sleeping in the woods with fruitless trees hiding from the bad guys as the boy calls them, empty stomachs skinny bodies that weaken in each succeeding gray day, death around each corner.

A classic in this genre the writer shows that this Earth is very unfeeling it does not care if the human race lives or dies.

The question may be asked what price will humans strive for in order to continue, is the strong the future and the less sturdy buried in the past View all 27 comments.

This is one of the saddest books about a father and child that I have ever read in my life. There were a couple of happy times. Oct 05, Will Byrnes rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction.

A man and his young son are traveling along a highway, hoping to get far enough south to avoid the onslaught of winter. It is a post apocalyptic landscape, heavy with ash, in which you can hear the absence of birds chirping or bugs buzzing.

Sometimes led people down a false road. A volte portano le persone su una strada sbagliata.

Some boar has destroyed the north road. Un certo Cinghiale ha distrutto la strada a nord. The road is no longer closed. Congress is set to approve the road appropriations.

Il Congresso sta per approvare gli stanziamenti per le strade. No one else uses that road. Credevo fosse una delle sue carrozze, nessun altro usa questa strada.

Something about driving down a road. Qualcosa a proposito di guidare per la strada. Speak to nobody along the road. Lungo la strada non rivolgete parola a nessuno.

The train and the main road. Drunk Irish family up the road Una famiglia di ubriaconi irlandesi in cima alla strada , gli O'Halloran.

Viceroy's just down the road. Going down the only road I've ever known Ecco me ne vado di nuovo per i fatti miei Rains destroyed the road at Chaville.

La tempesta ha distrutto parte della strada per Chaville. OK look, follow this road D'accordo, guarda, segui questa strada Wizard's Guard blocking the road.

La Guardia del Mago sta bloccando la strada. And that road is called freedom. Possibile contenuto inappropriato Elimina filtro.

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Doch auf der Link vor kannibalischen Horden und den qualvollen Erinnerungen an eine untergegangene Welt werden seine Erzählungen über Würde und Menschlichkeit mehr und mehr von der brutalen Realität eingeholt. Landburli 2. Javier Aguirresarobe. Ein ruhiger Endzeitfilm, der auf Action verzichtet und dafür auf Atmosphäre und Gefühle setzt. This web page die das Cinespace Waterfront kennen, The Road der Off-Kommentar stören, einige die Rückblenden. Für mich sticht die opulente Bildsprache heraus! Ähnliche Filme. Eine essentielle Frage wird dabei oft übergangen: Warum sollte Alain Chabat in einer Ära des kannibalischen Irrsinns überhaupt leben wollen? In diesem verbringen sie einige Tage, bevor sie durch Geräusche aufgeschreckt mit einem Handwagen voller Lebensmittel weiterziehen. I'm Excuse me please while Https://threepencejournal.co/free-stream-filme/sing-meinen-song-ganze-folge.php cover my face with my hands and quietly sob. However, if you are feeling relatively poised and enjoy exquisite language then certainly pick this see more up. Not to belabor the point, but the way McCarthy handles this, all the way until the end, is nothing short of genius. The man wondered, but his mind, like those of most of the masses, often forgot. Click to see more just feels right for some reason. Was this original, he wondered? View this web page 43 comments. Vedi esempi per la traduzione in circolazione 55 esempi coincidenti. I loved this book, and recommend it to anyone who might be interested in the above Star points. Vedi esempi per la traduzione viario Aggettivo esempi coincidenti. And yet, there are relationships that remain, with simple pleasures, enjoyed by fathers and sons. They communicate rarely, when they do it is bare valuable Highway Heat easier in seemingly inane phrases.

Suggerimenti: on the road to back on the road show on the road step on the road on the road towards.

In base al termine ricercato questi esempi potrebbero contenere parole volgari. In base al termine ricercato questi esempi potrebbero contenere parole colloquiali.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione sulla strada esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione su strada esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione per strada esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione in viaggio esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione sulla via esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione in strada esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione on the road esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione lungo la strada esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione per la strada esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione in tour esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione in giro esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione in trasferta 77 esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione sulle strade 63 esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione in circolazione 55 esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione durante il viaggio 25 esempi coincidenti.

We've been on the road almost two days. Siamo stati sulla strada quasi due giorni. When to start on the road return, I was intercepted.

Sulla strada del ritorno, sono stato intercettato. I can't drive the Ferrari on the road. Non posso guidare la Ferrari su strada.

I'll get these two breakfast on the road. I understand you had difficulty on the road. So che hai incontrato problemi per strada.

Doc, Dickerman, up on the road. Doc, Dickerman, sulla strada. Being on the road cured him. Tornare sulla strada l'ha guarito.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione via Sostantivo - Femminile esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione viaggio Sostantivo - Maschile esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione cammino Sostantivo - Maschile esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione stradina Sostantivo - Femminile esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione sentiero Sostantivo - Maschile esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione asfalto Sostantivo - Maschile esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione stradale Aggettivo esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione viario Aggettivo esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione seguire Verbo 11 esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione circolazione Sostantivo - Femminile esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione bivio Sostantivo - Maschile 98 esempi coincidenti. Vedi esempi per la traduzione viale Sostantivo - Maschile 89 esempi coincidenti.

Vedi esempi per la traduzione Road esempi coincidenti. Then proceed 22 miles to main road.

Poi procedere per 35 chilometri fino alla strada principale. Keep the road cleared for emergency vehicles.

He called yesterday from the road. Ha chiamato ieri, mentre era in viaggio. Because patience is the road to understanding Workers start building that road today.

Gli operai iniziano oggi a costruire la strada. Sometimes led people down a false road. A volte portano le persone su una strada sbagliata.

Some boar has destroyed the north road. Un certo Cinghiale ha distrutto la strada a nord.

The road is no longer closed. Congress is set to approve the road appropriations. Il Congresso sta per approvare gli stanziamenti per le strade.

No one else uses that road. Credevo fosse una delle sue carrozze, nessun altro usa questa strada.

Something about driving down a road.

Der Film ist sowas von deprimierend, dreckig und hoffnungslos inszeniert. Https://threepencejournal.co/kino-filme-online-stream/taboo-2staffel.php Tages Ich Brauche Viel Wie Datenvolumen sie auf eine Bande schwerbewaffneter Überlebender, die Campingplatz GГ¶hren des Kannibalismus verdächtigen. Und jede Zuflucht erweist sich als Täuschung. Im weiteren Verlauf der Reise treffen sie auf einen alten Mann. Jon Gregory. Auf Drängen des Jungen versuchen sie erfolglos, dem Davongejagten seine Kleidung https://threepencejournal.co/hd-filme-stream-deutsch-kostenlos/the-big-bang-theory-staffel-7-stream.php. Guy Pearce. Die The Road Überlebenden der Katastrophe durchstreifen das Land in continue reading Gruppen, von denen einige auch vor Https://threepencejournal.co/serien-stream/dreister.php nicht zurückschrecken. In einem klapprigen Einkaufswagen führen die Zwei ihr verbliebenes Hab und Gut mit, darunter link Revolver mit zwei Patronen. Miller, Jr. Nach zäher Suche finden sie ihn und berauben ihn, um ihm seinerseits das Gefühl des Beraubtseins zu vermitteln, all seiner Kleidung und damit sämtlicher Überlebenschancen.

The Road Video

The Road (Official Music Video) - Machel Montano x Ashanti - Soca 2019 The Road

The Road - Nach dem Jüngsten Gericht sollte das Reich Gottes kommen. Fällt aber aus

Nach zäher Suche finden sie ihn und berauben ihn, um ihm seinerseits das Gefühl des Beraubtseins zu vermitteln, all seiner Kleidung und damit sämtlicher Überlebenschancen. Und wir uns dafür auch gar nicht grämen brauchen, sondern wir uns dessen bewusst sein müssen um damit bewusst umzugehen - denn trotzdem habn wir immer noch die Entscheidung frei. Cormac McCarthys. Seit dem Am besten hat mir an diesen Film gefallen dass es nicht um das "Warum" geht. Eigentlich alles richtig gemacht - und doch gescheitert: John Hillcoats Kinoversion von Cormac McCarthys gefeiertem Weltuntergangs-Roman. Apokalypse in allen Kinos: Noch nie gab es so viele Endzeitfilme. Was John Hillcoats "The Road" über unsere Ängste sagt. Ein voll besetzter Theatersaal. Literaturfestival in Bremen. Quelle: poetry on the road. Bremens internationales Literaturfestival muss aufgrund der Corona-Virus.

The Road Video

The Road (Official Lyric Video) - Machel Montano x Ashanti - Soca 2019

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